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What are the different types of Simulator available?

Louise Cato -

Simulator has three options:

Budget Simulator

Points Simulator

Bill Simulator

 

Budget Simulator

Allows you to show the kinds of choices you must make as an organisation to balance your budget and to offer participants the chance to do the same. You can:

  • Set out your service areas and financial responsibilities, both those which generate income as well as those which are an expenditure
  • Assign real spending and income amounts to them
  • Set out your budget for the coming year/term, i.e. how much money needs to be saved
  • Choose the scale of options you give to participants in how much they are able to cut or increase budgets on services (-1%, -2% etc)
  • Clearly set out consequences for those choices to cut or increase expenditure

Points Simulator

Allows you to give participants a set of points for them to spend on their priorities. You can:

  • Set out and explain the options on which points can be spent
  • Set the number of points available to spend in total and the maximum for each individual item
  • Set ways to both spend points and to earn additional points to spend on other priorities e.g. 'Spend time volunteering in the local park' might earn the participant 3 points which they could spend on 'More frequent refuse collection'
  • Choose the scale for individual service groups
  • Explain the consequences of spending or earning points for each priority

Bill Simulator

Allows you to offer participants the chance to increase and decrease spending on certain services and to show how those choices may impact an example of your participant's bill, such as a council tax, property tax or utility bill. You can:

  • Give us a simple way of calculating this type of bill, based on your services
  • Give people an upfront option to input, for example, their property value or band to help determine their baseline bill
  • Set out your service areas and financial responsibilities which go into the bill, both those which generate income as well as those which are an expenditure
  • Assign real spending and income amounts to them
  • Choose the scale of options you give to participants in how much they are able to cut or increase budgets on services (-1%, -2% etc)
  • Clearly set out consequences for those choices to cut or increase expenditure